Playing smart with Google ads: how to do it?

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By Lucia Pons

Marketing brain

Google is still one of the biggest players (if not the biggest player) in the advertising industry thanks to its search engine's 1.2 trillion annual queries and 40,000 searches per second. Many of us use Google Ads to enhance the positioning of our websites so that users and potential customers find us; if you are not in the game, you are out! So let's see how we can find the most effective game plan.

One thing is for sure, it’s getting harder and harder to differentiate yourself from competitors in online advertising, tools, and services.

Depending on our goals and available resources, we can choose between the various types of ads available in Google Ads. Picking the best type of advertisement for your needs would certainly be the first step in developing a successful strategy.

1. PICK THE BEST TYPE OF AD

FYI: Even though different types of advertisements are typically used for specific goals and demand specific resources, this does not preclude you from picking any of these advertisements and focusing them on a different goal! 

Search network

Type: text ads with a maximum of three lines (30 characters) for the title and two description lines (90 characters each) for the body copy.

Placement: Google Search Engine Results.

Objective: Online traffic and conversion. According to Practical Ecommerce, the Google Display Network serves 6 billion impressions per day. (ComScore). 

Good if: you have a recognizable brand and are familiar with the interests of your target market. According to Specific Media, consumers who see display ads are 155% more likely to search for terms related to a particular brand or market segment.

Bad if: you lack solid graphics, design, or supporting resources. 

Google shopping

Type: a product photo, a description of up to 70 characters, and the product price

Placement: Google Search Engine.

Objective: eCommerce with conversion goals.

Good if: you run an online store and sell physical goods.

Bad if: your online store does not permit purchases directly, it’s under construction, or you lack high-quality product images.

Universal App Campaigns (UAC)

Type: image, app name, and description.

Placement: Playstore. 97% of the money spent on mobile search advertising goes to Google, according to Search Engine Land.

Objective: app download.

Good if: you have an app that has been developed.

Bad if: your app has negative reviews or you failed to correctly target your audience.


Local

Type: Google My Business tab.

Placement: Google Maps.

Objective: booking or positioning of a store.

Good if: you have a physical store. When making a local search, 72% of customers decide to go to a store that is five miles away. (Source: HubSpot Marketing Statistics).

Bad if: You have negative reviews or incomplete information on your listing.


The Google Ads help center is available at https://support.google.com/google-ads/?hl=es#topic=10286612, where you can find information on all kinds of Google campaigns.

2. CHOOSE A STRATEGY

As soon as we are sure of the type of campaign we want to run, we need to consider the resources we'll need to build it and research the tactics we'll employ. 

We should evaluate our resources in terms of both what we already have and what we can get. For instance, if we don't have a graphic designer but have the funds to hire one, we might be interested in creating some images for the display network. Similarly, if we have a store but no online sales are currently available, we might be interested in starting an eCommerce site or selling some of our products through social media, external platforms, or other means.

We must decide what approach to take after taking stock of what we want to test and how. To achieve this, we can look for inspiration in other campaigns that we find appealing, consult with our clients, or research the competition.  

In the case of text search ads, for instance, we might consider the following tactic: 

  • Product, where we place a greater emphasis on discussing the advantages of our goods or services.

  • Problem or pain points, where we will concentrate on the difficulty or suffering experienced by our target audience (and provide a solution).

  • Offer or discount, if we have something relevant that could be interesting for our target audience.

  • Alternatives to your competition, and be very clear about the contrasting benefits we offer.

  • Complementation of products or services, if we have some kind of integration or collaboration with other companies.

It goes without saying that the strategy you choose must always be connected to the goal of your campaign, and by extension, the goal of your company, but don't be afraid to research and test various options! 

You can contact Google to arrange a personal meeting with a specialist to help you determine the best ad strategy.

3. DECIDE YOUR BUDGET

It's time to bargain with your manager and use all of your brainpower to balance the budgets, so let's get started. 

Ads have the advantage of making it simple to set daily budget limits so you can modify them to fit your needs, but you should be careful not to set them too low or your advertisement might not be as effective as possible. 

What's the typical spending limit? It depends... On the nature of your company, its size, your objectives, your plan, etc. Here is an example of how to determine your spending budget, but we’re confident you can come up with your own method:

For inexperienced beginners or companies making their first Google Ads investment, Google advises capping the daily budget for a campaign at $50. But be careful; if you don’t invest enough, the algorithm won’t optimize your ads correctly.

4. ANALYZE YOUR RESULTS!

The best or worst part is now about to happen: testing and result analysis! 

It can be a dream or a headache to dive into an open, seemingly endless sea of statistics. You can use tools that create dashboards or visual comparisons, or you can go directly to the Google Ads platform to assist with campaign validation.

The best course of action, in our opinion, is to have a variety of options available and select the one that best suits each circumstance:

  • Google Ads to have a more thorough understanding of all campaigns and to track them on a weekly basis. Here is an article on how to track conversions:

  • Gretel to receive notifications in real-time about the progress of your campaigns and learn what is or what is not working.

  • Dashboards that allow for the cross-referencing of data from various campaigns to assess the costs and resources allocated to each channel.

We hope this will help with better ad execution, and if you have any successful, proven tactics that worked for you, please don't be shy about sharing them with us!

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